OLE_7687_R2

Steven A. Taylor
Distinguished Professor of Marketing

Business Address: Marketing Department
Campus Box 5590
Illinois State University
Normal , IL 61761
Phone: (309) 438-8772
staylor@ilstu.edu

Career Objectives and Research Interests

To pursue an academic career within a visionary organization that supports and recognizes excellence in teaching, research, and service. Research interests include the study of (1) the conceptual and operational foundations of service marketing, (2) social psychological models of the formation of relevant consumer outcomes within the context of services/relationship marketing, (3) marketing-related issues concerning customer satisfaction vis-à-vis judgment & decision making, (4) these issues vis-à-vis digital piracy, and (5) appropriately understanding the foundations of service quality and satisfaction in the delivery of education.

Education

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration, The Florida State University, 1992. Major Field: Marketing, Minor Field: Sociology Dissertation Topic: “An Empirically-Based Conceptualization and Operationalization of a Multidimensional Construct for Perceived Service Value.” Chairman: J. Joseph Cronin, Jr.
  • Federal Public Affairs Designator, DINFOS School, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, IN., 1987.
  • Masters of Health Services Administration, Florida International University, Miami, FL, 1986.
  • Bachelor of Science (Biology), The Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 1982.

Marketing Journal Editorial Review Board Membership

Co-Editor, Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction & Complaining Behavior, (2006-2013). Associate Editor, (2013-Present)
Member (Initial Invitee), Editorial Review Board, Journal of Service Research. (1997 to Present)
Member, Editorial Review Board, Journal of Service Management (formerly the International Journal of Service Industry Management), (1994 to present)
Member, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science (2016-Present)

Copyrighted, Peer-Reviewed, Blind-Refereed Publications

Books, Cases, Articles in Books, & Teaching Innovations

Taylor, Steven A. (2017), Critical Thinking and Business Decision Making. Germany: Scholar’s Press, ISBN: 978-3-330-65183-8.

Description: Effective business-related judgment and decision making today increasingly depends on the ability to think critically. However, most individuals instead tend to naturally rely on their opinions and confirmation biases. Business-related education and practice identify strengthening critical thinking skills as a key objective, yet there remains a dearth of educational tools to help business practitioners formally learn how to strengthen their critical thinking skills. This book, based on over two decades of experience formally teaching critical thinking to business students, provides such a tool. The text identifies arguments for embracing formal critical thinking techniques in business practice, identifies the objectives and measures of success for thinking critically, provides a specific process to help individuals engage in good critical thinking, identifies the special relationship between thinking critically and business ethics, and provides exercises related to emerging issues in business practices today. This text will benefit educators or practitioners interested in strengthening business-related judgment and decision making through critical thinking.

Taylor, Steven A. (2015). Spend a year working with a team of McGraw-Hill and teaching professionals developing seventeen 3-5 minute video cartoons to support the textbook titled Marketing, 5e by Grewal and Levy. These cartoons will become part of the Connect offering associated with this book.

Taylor, Steven A., Chiharu Ishida, and Horace Melton (2014), “A Meta-Analytic Investigation of the Antecedents of Digital Piracy,” in the Handbook of Service Marketing Research, Roland Rust and Ming-Hui Huang (Eds.). United Kingdom: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., pp. 437-466 (Invited Publication).

Description: Higgins and Marcum (2011) present a theoretical model of the antecedents of digital piracy intentions/behaviors that highlights social learning and self-control theories. A series of meta-analyses are undertaken to validate an extended version of their proposed conceptualization across the evidence to date. Results based upon forty-two studies representing 912 unique correlations and a combined sample size of 764,032 largely support the conceptualization. The results demonstrate positive relationships among social learning and self-control measures with digital piracy outcomes, but not so for demographic or external control measures (e.g., legal threats, copy protection, etc.). These results appear to support Taylor et al.’s (2009) conclusion as to the importance of marketing communications as the most viable approach to combating digital piracy. The managerial and research implications of the study are presented and discussed.

Taylor, Steven A. (1998), “Managing Customer Relations,” in the Handbook for Health Care Management, Jack Duncan, Peter M. Ginter, and Linda E. Swayne (Eds.). Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 64-81. (Invited Publication)

Description: The practice of customer relations in health services is investigated in light of services and relationship marketing theories. A model explicating the development of relationships in health care settings is first proposed that integrates the service quality, satisfaction, trust, and commitment constructs. A framework for developing effective customer relation programs is developed and presented based on the proposed model.

Taylor, Steven A. (1995), “Reconciling Service Quality Measurement with Attitudes,” Advances in Services Marketing Management: Research and Practice, Volume 4. Teresa A. Swartz, David E. Bowen, and Stephen W. Brown, Eds. Greenwich, CT: JAI Press 1-36. (Refereed Publication)

Description: An attempt is made to reconcile conceptual and operational models of the service quality construct with models of consumer attitudes. The review concludes that treating data collected using the SERVPERF scale by methods of weighted MDS provides the only apparent means of reconciling the position that service quality is a form of consumer attitude. The proposed method is demonstrated using data for four unique service industries.

Refereed Journal Publications

Taylor, Steven A., Nathan S. Hartman, and Joon-Ho Lim (2017), “Customer Journeys Through the Eyes of Undergraduate College Students,” Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction & Complaining Behavior, Volume 17, Forthcoming.

Description: Communicating the value associated with an undergraduate degree is one of the most vexing problems facing universities’ administrators. Universities are at an important crossroads, one that arguably confronts the soul of the academy. One fork in the road is to “stay the course” of traditional liberal education seeking well-roundedness and lifelong learning. The other fork is to acquiesce to growing marketization pressures that emphasize practitioner-related knowledge and skills in support of employment opportunities and efficacy. The current study uses the lens of service dominant logic (SDL) to view this dilemma, because SDL is the emerging general marketing logic based on a standard of achieved value and a stakeholder orientation (which may or may not be perceived equally across stakeholder groups). This exploratory descriptive study evaluates the preferences for perceived value based on marketization versus liberal education approaches using both descriptive and predictive techniques. The results suggest that the marketization versus liberal education choice may prove in the end to be a false choice! This suggests the possibility that the current controversy between advocates of marketization versus marketing may both be placated (to a degree) by creative solutions that merge liberal education with marketization pedagogical goals and measures of success. We believe that our findings provide useful insights for better higher education at this controversial time, particularly vis-à-vis student satisfaction. We also hope our study spurs further examination of the issues related to the marketization and marketing perspectives in higher education.

Taylor, Steven A., Chiharu Ishida, Joon-Ho Lim and Duleep Delpechitre (2017), “Transformative Service Practice in Higher Education: A Cautionary Note,” Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction & Complaining Behavior, Volume 17, Forthcoming.

Description: Calls for introducing transformative service research (TSR) into higher education marketing practices and theory by (1) incorporating eudaimonic well-being into constitutive and operational definitions of value co-creation and marketing “success,” and (2) theoretically embracing a service dominant logic underlying the marketing of higher education. A study of 232 undergraduate students in the United States is presented that investigates the linkages between students’ perceptions of the perceived value and measures of eudaimonic well-being associated with course offerings. Results reveal that: (1) the purported unidimensional nature of Waterman et al.’s (2010) QEWB scale of eudaimonic well-being is not apparent in an educational context; (2) students’ perceptions of the perceived value are positively related to measures of student engagement but poorly related to measures of eudaimonic well-being; (3) the centrality dimension of materialism moderates the relationship between perceived value and eudaimonic well-being (as purposeful personal responsiveness); and (4) students’ perceptions of perceived value indirectly contribute to various forms of eudaimonic well-being through different forms of student engagement. The results suggest support for efforts to incorporate TSR into academic practices related to business education. However, for this to occur, the marketing emphasis in higher education will have to take care with marketization emphases (student satisfaction, training, etc.), instead focusing on marketing appeals that encourage higher education stakeholder groups to more greatly value eudaimonic goal achievement.

Taylor, Steven A., Chiharu Ishida, and Leigh Anne Novak Donovan (2016),”Considering the Role of Affect and Anticipated Emotions in the Formation of Consumer Loyalty Intentions,” Psychology and Marketing, 33 (10), 814-829.

Description: Ajzen and Sheikh (2013) recently challenge calls for adding explicit measures of emotions or affect as independent constructs into the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA). This assertion has potentially significant theoretical and operational implications for marketers in terms of parsimony and insight. The specific questions of whether or not the addition of anticipated forms of emotions and/or hedonic attitudes to traditional attitude-based models meaningfully contributes to understanding loyalty intention formation in a retail marketing setting are empirically assessed in this research. Results suggest that, consistent with the arguments of Perugini and Bagozzi (2001), the independent addition of anticipated emotions to attitude models such as the TRA, Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), and Model of Goal-Directed Behavior (MGB) can be justified in terms of model fit with data, predictive validity (∆R2), and efficacy in explanation. Interestingly, however, and consistent with the theoretical arguments underlying the TRA, the models receiving the most overall support appear to be models wherein AttitudeOverall mediates the contributions of positive and negative anticipated emotions on endogenous variables such as Desires and IntentionsLoyalty. While it remains up to the individual marketer which perspective to embrace given the observed gains reported herein, the present research also supports the notion that the addition of hedonic attitude forms and/or anticipated emotions can offer an overall net gain for many marketers. The managerial and research implications of the results are discussed.

Taylor, Steven A. (2016), “Attitude and Gender as Predictors of Insurance Loyalty,” International Journal of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, 6 (3), 99-102. 10.5923/j.ijpbs.20160603.01

Description: Financial services marketing issues related to consumer loyalty with insurance products continues to grow in both importance and challenge, none-the-less, remain poorly understood. A scenario-based study is presented that empirically validates via structural equation-based mediation analyses existing arguments that (1) both cognitive and affective considerations affect consumer decision-making vis-à-vis loyalty intentions to auto insurers post-poor service delivery, and (2) these considerations vary by gender. The research and managerial implications are presented and discussed. Originally accepted by the Proceedings of the 2016 International Symposium on Social Sciences and Management, Fukuoka, Japan, February 1-3, 2016, pp. 48-54. Invited, re-refereed journal publication as a best paper from the conference.

Chang, Woojung and Steven A. Taylor (2016), “The Effectiveness of Customer Participation in New Product Development: A Meta-Analytic Investigation,” Journal of Marketing, Vol. 80 (January 2016), 47-64.

Description: Marketers have experienced a great deal of variance in new product development (NPD) performance when attempting to source external knowledge from customers as part of the process. A strong contributor to this phenomenon has been the lack of a systematic conceptual and empirically validated framework providing guidance for when customer participation is likely to lead to innovation success. Building upon knowledge management theory, this paper presents a conceptual framework that synthesizes a variety of contingency factors. A meta-analysis empirically examines the effects of identified contextual factors between customer participation and NPD performance. The analysis first discloses the importance of which stage of NPD to involve customers. Results reveal that involving customers in the ideation and launch stages improves new product financial performance directly and indirectly via acceleration of time to market, whereas customer participation in the development phase slows down time to market and in turn deteriorates new product financial performance. Second, the results identify that returns of customer participation on NPD performance are greater in technologically turbulent NPD projects, emerging countries, and low-tech industries, and for business customers and small firms. The theoretical and managerial implications about when to engage customers in the innovation process are explored.

Ishida-Lambert, Chiharu, Woojung Chang, and Steven A. Taylor (2016), “Moral Intensity, Moral Awareness, and Ethical Predispositions: The Case of Insurance Fraud,” Journal of Financial Services Marketing, 21 (1), March 2016, 4-18.

Description: The issue of insurance fraud by consumers continues to perplex insurance firms, costing billions of dollars per year in the US alone. Some analysts report that 10% or more of property/casualty insurance claims are fraudulent, while less than 20% of fraudulent claims being detected. Consumer attitudes are becoming more tolerant of insurance fraud in recent years. Recognizing that not all insurance fraud situations are created equal, we investigate variability in perceptions of moral intensity in dissimilar insurance padding situations in a 2 (to help others versus to profit self) X 2 (a small credit union versus a large online insurer) model and compared the results between two independent samples (college students/Millennials and an older adult population). We also investigated the impact of ethical predispositions (formalism and utilitarianism) on moral awareness and moral judgment using these four scenarios. The results suggest that the Millennials may exhibit more situationalism and more lenient judgments of collaborative versus unilateral ethical violations. In particular, ‘for self’ versus ‘for others’ comparisons show striking differences between the two age groups. The results add to the growing literature in explaining intra-personal variability in moral decision making.

Taylor, Steven A. and Gary L. Hunter (2015), “Best Buy & Showrooming: A Critical Thinking Case Exercise Based Upon Service Dominant Logic & Value Co-Creation,” Journal of Creating Value, 1 (2), 1-19.

Description: This article shows how a critical thinking perspective in teaching business cases can create value for students and educators. We introduce a free, online case emphasizing value co-creation in a consumer retail setting that was co-developed by marketing faculty at Illinois State University, Best Buy, and IBM. The case focuses on the problems of showrooming (i.e., evaluating products in a physical store, but purchasing products via another channel such as online) and webrooming (i.e., researching products online, but purchasing the products in physical stores) that currently challenge many traditional retailers. The extent of the information created through the case videos of involved managers and other means encourage critical thinking which supports the achievement of higher-order thinking skills in students’ business decision-making, The case further adds additional value by (1) providing current summaries of the emerging marketing literature related to service dominant logic, value co-creation, and customer engagement, and (2) engendering greater student engagement in learning. The case is freely distributed, and can be found at http://business.illinoisstate.edu/bestbuy/. Suggestions for extending and/or improvement of the case are encouraged.

Taylor, Steven A., Hulda Black, Leigh-Anne Novak Donovan, and Kimberly Judson (2015), “Social Involvement and Social Well-Being in Attainment of Millennial Flourishing,” Journal of Happiness and Well-Being, 3 (2), 126-141.

Description: There have been recent calls for positioning human flourishing and well-being as foundations for business school curriculum. Despite these calls, specifically how to evolve educational practices toward a greater focus on flourishing and well-being as opposed to a focus on job training and other marketization emphases remains a conundrum for business educators. The current research empirically relates academic achievement, social involvement, and subjective well-being to the flourishing of a millennial cohort of university business students. Our results demonstrate that self-perceived flourishing goal achievement appears to fully mediate the direct effect from social involvement to social well-being. This implies that simply involving students in a greater number of social activities alone will likely not contribute to their well-being. Rather, our results show it is the congruence of social activities and behaviors with their flourishing-related goals as the most efficacious path to increasing student well-being in higher education. We are able to show that an emphasis on flourishing in higher education instead of the current and traditional method of focusing on value delivery and sales (i.e., marketization) appear reasonably achievable with the Millennial cohort. Results indicate that self-perceived flourishing goal achievement appears to fully mediate the direct relationship from social involvement to social well-being.

Taylor, Steve A. and Gary Hunter (2014), “Value, Satisfaction, and Loyalty: An Evolving Conceptualization,” Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction & Complaining Behavior, Volume 14, 19-42.

Description: Invited/refereed publication. A little over a decade ago Taylor and Hunter (2003) reported an exploratory investigation into the relative roles of perceived value, satisfaction, trust, and brand attitude in explaining loyalty within the (B2B) eCRM industry in the Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction and Complaining Behavior. The following revisits the findings of this study in light of the many advances in service marketing theory since the article’s publication. An annotated literature review is presented that highlights the continuing evolution of the concept of “value” vis-à-vis loyalty and satisfaction research toward value co-creation consistent with the influential arguments of Vargo and Lusch’s (2004) service dominant logic (hereafter, SDL) and the Service Logic (hereafter, SL) perspective advocated by the Nordic School of Service Marketing (Gronroos 2008, 2011). The conclusions of this review include (1) the basic predictive relationships identified in Taylor and Hunter’s (2003) model appear supported by subsequent studies, however, (2) significant advances in service marketing theory are providing exciting new insights and avenues of inquiry in the areas of satisfaction and loyalty management.

Taylor, Steve A., Hulda G. Black, Leigh Anne Novak Donovan, Chiharu Ishida, And Kim Judson (2014), “The Relationship Between Eudaimonic Well-Being and Social Well-Being with Millennials,” Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction & Complaining Behavior, Volume 14, 102-117.

Description: There appears to be growing support for calls to accentuate marketing practices in higher education that emphasize positive psychology forms of satisfaction over simple measures of credentialing for employment (i.e., marketization). A study is reported that empirically considers the potential of acting upon these recent calls for including eudaimonia and well-being in measures of success in the operations of universities. Such efforts will necessarily occur within the domain of positive social psychology. We propose and empirically assess a theory of positive social psychology that reconciles self-determination theory, goal hierarchy theory (and means-end theory), as well as the theory of the mind associated with these calls. The reported study provides empirical evidence supporting the possibility that universities can affect the social well-being of students as stakeholders by focusing on eudaimonic- and flourishing-related goal achievement. This suggests an emphasis on higher forms of satisfaction. The implications for university marketers and decision makers, as well as social science researchers, are presented and discussed.

Taylor, Steve A., Leigh Anne Novak Donovan, and Chiharu Ishida (2014), “Consumer Trust and Satisfaction in the Formation Consumer Loyalty Intentions in Transactional Exchange: The Case of a Mass Discount Retailer,” Journal of Relationship Marketing, 13 (4), 125–154.

Description: Marketing relationships can be placed on a continuum from short, discrete transactions to ongoing brand relationships. The majority of recent work has focused on relational exchanges, with some scholars even suggesting early on that the marketing discipline was undergoing a paradigm shift from a transaction-based marketing perspective toward relational exchange perspective. However, there has been a growing recognition that not all customers seek relational exchanges. Consequently, the current research considers customer relationship management (CRM) from the less studied, but oft seen, perspective of transactional exchange. A study is presented using recent advances in structural equation analyses including Bayesian estimation methods and mediation analyses. We further consider the psychological processes underlying the formation of consumer loyalty based on pre- and post-purchase measurements taken over multiple time periods. We specifically hypothesize that consumer satisfaction judgments will fully mediate any influences of post-purchase trust judgments on future loyalty intentions. With American consumers’ trust in businesses being all-time low, coupled with the recent trend that more and more brick-and-mortar retailers are at risk of “showrooming” for online retailers, there is an apparent need to also consider retail customers who see the value of relationship marketing only selectively.

Taylor, Steven A. and Judson, Kimberly (2014), “The Nature of Stakeholder Satisfaction with Marketing Education,” Higher Education Studies, 4 (4), 89-107.

Description: The current article represents a cautionary tale in continuing emerging marketization practices as the dominant form of marketing with higher education. Specifically, a review of three important emerging literature streams (i.e., quality-of-life, service-dominant logic, and stakeholder orientation) all appear to support calls for moving beyond typical (short-term, hedonistic) measures of consumer satisfaction associated with the delivery of higher education toward satisfaction judgments based on higher-order forms of happiness (i.e., prudential and perfectionist forms of happiness such as eudaimonia). This conclusion suggests that the nature of long-term value co-creation associated with higher education should focus on quality of life and well-being. Critical to the success of moving marketing strategy of institutions of higher education in the direction asserted herein will be embracing a primary strategic marketing objective of convincing stakeholders to value long-term, eudaimonic forms of happiness and satisfaction over the current psychological, short-term, hedonistic satisfaction forms assessing today’s marketization practices. A series of propositions are offered to help guide marketers in embracing this perspective.

Taylor, Steven A., MyoungJin Kim, Chiharu Ishida, and Jamie R. Mulligan (2014), “Augmenting Null Hypothesis Significance Testing in Marketing Research,” Journal of Management and Marketing Research, Volume 15, 1-24.

Description: Issues related to null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) are well known in marketing research. In light of recent developments with the American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual (2010) we attempt to stimulate discussion concerning the argument for marketing researchers to begin moving more aggressively toward statistical estimation of effect size and confidence intervals to supplement the traditional use of NHST that emphasizes dichotomous, accept-reject (or whether a relationship exists-doesn’t exist) outcomes. We review the literature concerning the current issues and known remedies related to NHST, and then present a methodological framework for marketing researchers’ consideration to augment current reporting practices. The proposed framework is demonstrated in a study related to the well-known expectancy disconfirmation theory of satisfaction.

Taylor, Steve A., Woojung Chang, Chiharu Ishida, Leyla Orudzheva, and Aaron Barton (2014), “Identifying the Goal Structures of Undergraduate Students Via-a-vis Ethical Decision Making,” Journal of American Academy of Business, Cambridge, 20 (1), 66-72.

Description: Segal et al. (2013) present evidence that a problem appears to be emerging in that attitudes of university students toward business ethics appear to be changing in arguably undesirable ways. An argument is presented for increased efforts to bring judgment and decision-making and social psychological theory and practice to bear on this issue in order to assist in pedagogical efforts to strengthen college students’ underlying cognitive goal-related value structures. A qualitative method is demonstrated that operationalizes these goal-related value structures. The implications for stakeholders of business colleges are discussed. This paper was co-published with two MBA students from Illinois State University.

Judson, Kimberly and Steven A. Taylor (2014), “Moving from Marketization to Marketing of Higher Education: The Co-Creation of Value in Higher Education,” Higher Education Studies, 4 (1), 51-67.

Description: This paper extends the arguments of Taylor and Judson (2011) calling for movement of higher education from marketization models to true marketing models aimed at creating long-term co-created value. First, the differences between marketization versus marketing perspectives in higher educational models of delivery are articulated. Second, the confluence of forces that have led to marketization models are identified and modeled conceptually. The implications of the marketization perspective are also identified, including (1) an increased reliance on student evaluations as the primary/sole basis of faculty performance evaluations, subsequent grade inflation, and the general transformation of education into a private good (commodity) as opposed to the original view of higher education as a public good. Finally, a conceptual model of higher education “performance” is presented focusing on enhancing human capabilities (outcomes) as opposed to retail-related perceptions and judgments (e.g., hedonistic satisfaction). The model is offered in the spirit of enticing debate to consider embracing more current marketing theory related to services and value co-creation (Vargo and Lusch 2004) instead of a continued reliance on arguably outdated selling models in the delivery of higher education.

Taylor, Steven A. (2013), “Affect and Marketing Stimuli in Consumer Loyalty Decisions to Automobile Insurers,” Journal of Financial Services Marketing, 18, 4-16.

Description: Most insurance loyalty studies assume largely cognitive psychological underpinnings. A study is conducted that investigates the relative contributions of cognitive versus affective influences on the desire to be loyal to an automobile insurer after a poor service experience. 315 respondents were introduced to scenarios that manipulated the response to an advertisement to switch insurers by price- and brand-related marketing influences to investigate their influence on anticipated regret. The results support the conclusions that both cognitive and affective considerations are important to consumer judgment and decision-making (J/DM) processes in the context of car insurance, that male and female customers may vary in their J/DM processes with car insurance, and that insurance modelers of J/DM should consider outside influences on consumers in studies, particularly marketing-related brand and price perceptions. Failure to do so can lead to a failure to correctly predict potential action versus inaction effects associated with anticipated regret.

Taylor, Steven A. (2012c), “Satisfaction, Regret, and Status Quo Effects in the Formation of Consumer Loyalty,” Journal of Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, & Complaining Behaviors, Volume 25, 24-45.

Description: Consumer loyalty continues to be an important marketing consideration. A model of consumer loyalty is proposed that furthers efforts to model satisfaction-based explanations of consumer loyalty formation within emerging goal-directed, attitude-based models of judgment and decision making. The results of an empirical study support the proposed model of the process of loyalty formation, yielding benefits that include (1) helping to reconcile loyalty explanations with models of judgment and decision making; (2) contributing to identifying the unique roles of anticipated regret, anticipated emotions generally, and satisfaction judgments in the process; (3) demonstrating the need to consider status quo effects as a moderator to loyalty formation; and (4) suggesting the possibility of status quo effects influencing the role of many other concepts in explanations of loyalty formation. The managerial and research implications of the reported study are explicated and discussed.

Taylor, Steven A. (2012b), “Implicit Attitudes and Digital Piracy,” Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, 6 (4), 281-297.

Purpose: An argument for the importance of unconscious processes is emerging across social science literatures (Petty et al., 2009; Uleman, 2005). This study investigates the role of implicit attitudes on the formation of digital piracy desires and behavioral intentions. If implicit attitudes are found to contribute to consumer digital piracy intentions, then marketers face an additional challenge in developing effective strategies and appeals designed to attenuate the practice. Design/methodology/approach: The study captures both indirect and direct measures of implicit attitudes to test the research model. Two hundred and eighty five respondents provided data in a controlled lab setting for purposes of structural equation analyses. Findings: The results first contribute to growing evidence generally supporting the importance of attitudinal influences in the formation of digital piracy intentions. The reported study further suggests the necessity of including implicit attitudinal considerations in explanatory models of these behaviors, particularly attitudinal explanatory models. Specifically, marketers attempting to manage DP should consider implicit attitudes in explanatory models of DP intention formation in addition to traditional self-report measures of attitudes. Originality/Value: The study presents the first known empirical evidence supporting the contribution of implicit attitudes to digital piracy desires. Considering implicit influences in this process offers the promise of increasing our understanding of how digital piracy behaviors form, which can offer insights into how to more effectively attenuate the practice.

Taylor, Steven A. (2012a), “Evaluating Digital Piracy Intentions on Behaviors,” Journal of Service Marketing, 26 (7), 472-483.

Description: Digital piracy continues to perplex service marketers producing easily-replicable digital products such as music, movies, software, etc. Academic studies have produced mixed results concerning the impact of DP practices on service marketing, with some studies generally supporting a negative influence, while others suggest a neutral or even positive influence. None-the-less, there have recently emerged practitioner and academic calls for marketing communication strategies to attenuate digital piracy practices in service marketing practitioner responses. Critical to assessing the efficacy of these marketing communication strategies will be measuring their impact on digital piracy behaviors. However, there are several challenges in measuring digital piracy behaviors. First, it is difficult to directly observe an individual’s digital piracy behaviors. Consequently, much of the academic and practitioner work to date has relied on self-report measures of intentions and behaviors. Unfortunately, until the results reported herein it has been unknown how much of the variance in digital piracy behaviors are explained by digital piracy -related behavioral intentions. A number of meta-analyses suggest that the average explained variance of behaviors based on intentions is between 20%-30%. Second, reliance on self-report intention measures assumes minimal amounts of measurement error in survey research, which can be a tenuous assumption. Finally, the argument that digital piracy is a conscious behavior (thus implying the formation of an intention) suggests that models of digital piracy behavior formation correspond to some underlying social psychological model. The current research reports two studies that together address the three identified concerns. Study 1 presents and tests a new framework to assess both common method variance and measurement error. Analyses based on 321 surveys demonstrate (1) consistency with the Theory of the Mind as an underlying social psychological theoretical model, and (2) an absence of potential measurement issues related to digital piracy intention formation. Study 2 replicates Study 1 based on a separate sample of 267 respondents, and extends the nomological net to directly observed digital piracy behaviors across a peer-to-peer network. The results suggest that digital piracy intentions explain 36% of the variance in observed digital piracy behaviors. In addition, a two-dimensional conceptualization of frequency of past behaviors is identified based upon exploratory factor analysis using structural equation modeling. The two studies reported herein provide a first effort to empirically relate behavioral intention data to unobtrusively observed digital piracy behaviors across peer-to-peer networks. The study was possible based on newly emerging experimental hardware measuring file uploads and downloads associated with peer-to-peer network activity. Practically, the results afford service marketers assurance that self-report measures of digital piracy behavioral intentions can serve as predictive measures of future behaviors. This helps make the collection of data in this context both achievable and practical. Also, a methodological framework is identified to strengthen measurement models associated with this type of research. Finally, a well-known social psychological model is advocated as a theoretical basis for theory development related to digital piracy. Future research might consider the motivational and attitudinal antecedents to digital piracy intention formation.

Ishida-Lambert, Chiharu and Steven A. Taylor (2012), “Retailer Brand Experience, Brand Experience Congruence, and Consumer Satisfaction” Journal of Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, & Complaining Behaviors, Volume 25, 63-79.

Description: In light of the recent development of the brand experience construct, we conducted a study in order to test (1) the usefulness of the concept in a retailing context and (2) how the brand experience with a focal retailer and that of an alternative retailer operate as they lead to creation of brand personality, satisfaction, and loyalty. For the latter, we use the recent methodological advancements based on Cheung’s (2009) structural equation modeling-based latent congruence model (LCM). We replicated Brakus et al.’s (2009) model of brand experience for these purposes. The results show that a retail setting offers a unique perspective on brand experience and brand experience congruence, as well as their consequences.

Taylor, Steven A., Jamie R. Mulligan, and Chiharu Ishida-Lambert (2012), “Facebook, Social Networking, and Business Education,” American Journal of Business Education, 5 (4), 1-12.

Description: Brown (2012) asserts that faculty perceptions of Web 2.0 for teaching will influence its adoption. For example, social media’s influence on educational delivery is growing (Hrastinski and Dennon 2012). Zulu et al. (2011) note that business educators are only beginning to understand social networking related to education. We report an exploratory inquiry that confirms the growing evidence that many undergraduate business students do not support the use of Facebook as part of their formal academic relationships. However, an argument is presented that while existing tools for social networking such as Facebook may offer limited pedagogical utility, social networking as a concept none-the-less offers significant potential.

Ishida-Lambert, Chiharu and Steven A. Taylor (2012), “An Alternative Measure Of Relative Brand Attitudes,” The Journal of Product & Brand Management, Volume 21 (5), Fall/Winter 2012, 317-327.

Description: Two studies are reported with the purpose of demonstrating and establishing the efficacy of using an alternative method of operationalizing relative brand attitudes based on Cheung’s (2009) Latent Congruence Model (LCM). Data are collected concerning brand attitudes related to their product (Study 1) and retailer (Study 2) preferred and best alternative brands. Structural equation modeling is used to demonstrate and validate the LCM model, as well as to relate relative brand attitudes to satisfaction judgments and loyalty behaviors. Two separate samples of respondents across two unique marketing settings (product and retailer brands) support the LCM-based view of relative brand attitude proposed herein. In addition, results suggest that preferred brands are most strongly related to satisfaction with the preferred brand, however, relative brand attitudes are alternatively related to preferred brand loyalty. Thus, relative brand attitudes appear to have both direct and indirect (through satisfaction) influences on brand loyalty. Practical implications include the availability of a usable method of operationalizing relative brand attitudes in a way that (1) fully utilizes HED/UT attitude scale for absolute and relative brand attitudes measures and (2) can control for measurement error. The proposed method thus provides a means to strengthen measurement models associated with relative brand concepts. The reported studies offer an alternative and practical method of measuring relative brand attitudes in a way that results in practical insights about consumer satisfaction and brand loyalty.

Taylor, Steven A., Gary Hunter, Horace Melton, and Stephen Goodwin (2011), “Student Engagement and Marketing Classes,” Journal of Marketing Education, 33 (1), 73-92.

Description: A study is reported that investigates the goals underlying undergraduate students’ engagement in their major classes, non-major classes, and in extracurricular activities. The qualitative study employs both focus groups and goal-mapping exercises. The results suggest that students tend to focus on utilitarian, attribute level considerations mainly related to credentialing for purposes of employment. The results are considered from the perspectives of judgment and decision making, learning models, and the emerging service marketing perspective. These model considerations underscore an argument for moving toward models of education delivery focusing on value co-creation instead of the current emphasis on providing value to students. A series of recommendations are offered to help facilitate faculty efforts to increase course engagement, particularly in large-section course offerings. However, the authors ultimately conclude that student engagement with their course-related experiences will best be served in models of value co-creation by a focus on more than intellectual maturity in education. Specifically, an argument is presented for also targeting moral and motivational maturity. The practical and research implications of the study are presented and discussed.

Taylor, Steven A. and Kim Judson (2011), “A Service Perspective on the Marketization of Undergraduate Education,” Service Science, 3 (2), pp. 1-18.

Description: Higher education in the United States is rapidly moving toward a marketized model of service provision, one emphasizing marketing practices based upon relevance and student satisfaction. The results of the study reported herein suggest that such strategies may not ensure equal balance between service quality and the quality of education as a service. Specifically, a study is presented suggesting that grades (an indicant of learning) are neither endogenous (positively related to) or exogenous (antecedent to) a typical service quality/customer satisfaction model vis-à-vis Introduction to Marketing courses. If student service quality perceptions, satisfaction judgments, and engagement practices are indeed unrelated to grades at the classroom level, then a question exists as to how well a focus on student satisfaction (and relevance) actually engender student involvement in the value co-creation process in education delivery. The following study suggests diligence in balancing the quality of the educational service versus service quality practices within the context of the marketization of education, and continued efforts by service marketers to better understand the unique service marketing characteristics of the educational product. The research and managerial implications of the reported study are presented and discussed.

Taylor, Steven A., Stephen A. Goodwin, Horace Melton, and Gary Hunter (2011), “An Analysis of the Student Course Engagement Questionnaire (SCEQ) in Large-Section Principles Classes,” Journal of Excellence in College Teaching, 22 (1), pp. 29-58.

Description: A significant challenge facing administrators and faculty in universities and other institutions of higher learning concerns student engagement (Carle et al., 2009). While the bulk of organizational emphasis to this point has been on students’ perceptions of overall engagement (macro-engagement) across all of their experiences within a university, we assert that it remains questionable whether or not overall student engagement with an institution of higher learning can be significantly impacted over time without supporting engagement between faculty and students at the individual course level (course-specific micro-engagement). A study is presented that assesses the psychometric properties of a course-specific micro-engagement scale, with results highlighting the need for continued efforts toward developing valid and reliable measures of course-specific micro-engagement. In addition, a quasi-experiment examines whether or not course-specific micro-engagement differs as a function of delivery format (face-to-face lecture versus online lecture).

Taylor, Steven A., Chiharu Ishida, and David W. Wallace (2009), “Intention to Engage in Digital Piracy: A Conceptual Model and Empirical Test,” Journal of Service Research, 11 (3), pages 246-262.

Description: Digital piracy represents a significant threat to the marketers of digital service products. Industry efforts to attenuate the practice, often deterrent in nature, have largely failed. We propose that one reason for this failure is the absence of a commensurably-accepted model of the social psychological foundations underlying digital piracy behaviors. A modified version of Perugini and Bagozzi’s (2001) Model of Goal Directed Behavior is advocated and empirically validated across both movie and music industry settings for this purpose. The results support the theoretical and empirical efficacy of the proposed model, and highlight the importance of attitudes toward the act of digital piracy, the frequency of past digital piracy behaviors, and the motivations and intentions underlying digital piracy. A normative framework is proposed with five actionable recommendations to assist digital service marketers in better addressing digital piracy. The research implications of the reported study are also presented and discussed.

Taylor, Steven A. (2008), “Reconciling Satisfaction, Emotions, Attitudes, and Ambivalence Within Consumer Models of Judgment and Decision Making: A Cautionary Tale,” Journal of Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, & Complaining Behaviors, Volume 20, pages 41-65.

Description: Marketers typically conceive of satisfaction as having a very close, if not direct, influence on consumers’ behaviors. However, it is well established that behavioral intentions are generally the proximal cause of volitional behaviors, and there exists a well established literature concerning how intentions influence behaviors in the judgment and decision making (J/DM) literature. The following study asserts that Marketers have yet to realize a full understanding of how satisfaction and attitudes work together to influence consumer decision making within such models, particularly in the presence of consumer ambivalence. A theoretical model of consumer J/DM is first proposed that purports to reconcile emerging attitudinal models of goal-directed behaviors with satisfaction theory in a manner that helps clarify the unique roles of attitudes and satisfaction as well as accommodates the phenomenon of ambivalence. The proposed model revisits dissonance research based upon emerging arguments related to constraint satisfaction theory (CST) in the identification of a common cognitive process linking satisfaction and attitudes as unique constructs in behavioral intention formation. Second, one interesting theoretical implication of the proposed model is the appearance of support for the possibility that ambivalent emotional responses can occur either simultaneously (see Carrera and Oceja 2007), or sequentially (see Brehm and Miron 2006). Marketing’s traditional perspective suggests an assumption of sequential emotions which implies that consumption-related emotions must be either positive or negative. However, a field experiment is reported that fails to replicate Brehm and Miron’s (2006) test of this issue specific to satisfaction (as well as a host of other positive and negative emotions). Thus, these findings suggest caution in conclusions related to the existence of simultaneous versus sequential emotions in consumer behavior and supports calls for further research into ambivalence as it relates to attitudes, satisfaction, and emotions within the context of J/DM in consumer research. The managerial and research implications of the study are identified and discussed.

Beggs, Jeri Mullins, John H. Bantham, and Steven A. Taylor (2008), “Distinguishing the Factors Influencing College Students’ Choice of Major,” College Student Journal, 42 (2), June 2008.

Description: Choosing a college major represents a major life decision–a decision that research has shown to be the most frequently identified life regret for Americans. The focus of this study is to identify the foundations of the psychological process by which undergraduate students select their academic majors. A mean-send analysis was first employed to identify the factors that students consider integral to the process of selecting a major. This qualitative study was followed by a large-sample survey of undergraduate students and used conjoint analysis to better understand how “important” the identified factors are to students as part of this decision-making process. Finally, feedback from practitioners was sought and used to create a list of recommendations for recruiting and advising today’s college students.

Taylor, Steven A. (2007), “Broadening and Deepening Attitude-Based Models of Goal-Directed Behaviors,” British Journal of Social Psychology, 46, pages 739-768.

Description: Social science attempts to incorporate emotions into models of judgment and decision making have faced significant theoretical challenges, as well as produced conflicting empirical results. The following study first contributes to the body of knowledge by providing a theoretical explanation for the observed conflicting results from such models. In fact, both extant theory and the results reported herein suggest that a certain amount of variability in results should be expected from empirical investigations based on such models, particularly related to differences in respondents’ level of affective versus cognitive involvement. Second, an argument is presented for considering a special case of Perugini and Bagozzi’s (2001) Model of Goal-Directed Behaviours (MGB) when investigating these issues using attitude-based explanations of goal-related behaviours. Specifically, empirical evidence is presented for broadening the MGB Model by including anticipated regret as an explanatory variable independent of other anticipated emotions, and deepening the theory by calling for multidimensional conceptualizations of the attitude and perceived behavioural control constructs. The implications of the reported study are presented and discussed.

Celuch, Kevin, Stephen Goodwin and Steven A. Taylor (2007), “Understanding Small Scale Industrial User Internet Purchase and Information Management Intentions: A Test of Two Attitude Models,” Industrial Marketing Management, 36, 109-120.

Description: The present research compares two attitudinal models – variants of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TOPB) in terms of understanding the determinants of industrial buyer intentions to use the internet. The first variant of the Theory of Planned Behavior examines a decomposed perceived behavioral control construct that consists of self-efficacy and perceived control. The second variant of the TOPB model adds past behavior. Data from small scale users of industrial equipment are used to explore the models using structural equation modeling. While both variants of the TOPB are comparable in terms of standard fit indices, the variant with past behavior added substantially to the variance explained for internet purchase intentions. These results hold implications for future theory, research, and management of information technology-related small scale industrial buyer motivation.

Steven A. Taylor, Gary L. Hunter, and Deborah L. Lindberg (2006), “Understanding (Customer Based) Brand Equity in Financial Services,” Journal of Services Marketing, 21 (4), 241-252.

Description: The purpose of this study is to advance marketers’ understanding of customer-based brand equity (CBBE) within the context of a B2B financial service marketing setting. Two nationwide studies are conducted in a financial service setting to (1) investigate whether brands are in fact differentiated in the minds of the target audience, (2) test two competing explanations of the formation of CBBE using structural equation analyses, and (3) reconcile satisfaction and CBBE theories within a single theoretical model. The results first suggest that customers in the financial service setting investigated do indeed differentiate brands, and that Netemeyer et al’s (2004) model of CBBE is generally supported when generalized to a financial service setting. However, the extended model of CBBE proposed herein appears to offer the benefits of (1) explaining more variance in loyalty intentions, while (2) simultaneously demonstrating the importance of customer satisfaction in CBBE models, and (3) incorporating customer attitudes into conceptualization of CBBE. In addition, we report evidence supporting the need to incorporate both utilitarian and hedonic forms of brand attitudes when reconciling brand attitudes in CBBE models. The results will pragmatically help financial service marketers measure CBBE as well as relate brand power to customer satisfaction and customer attitude measurement. The overall key implication is that customer attitudes, satisfaction and CBBE are related and can/should be simultaneously considered in explanatory models of marketing behaviors in financial service settings. A framework is presented including relevant measures that will allow financial service marketers to replicate the research model tested herein in their own competitive setting in support of marketing decision making.

Taylor, Steven A., Gary L. Hunter, and Timothy Longfellow (2006), ”Testing an Expanded Attitude Model of Goal Directed Behavior in a Loyalty Context,” Journal of Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, & Complaining Behaviors, Volume 19, pages 18-39.

Description: Marketers have known for some time that satisfaction is closely linked to loyalty intentions (Oliver 1997, 1999). However, Johnson et al (2006) argue that the drivers of customer loyalty intentions are complex and dynamic, changing and evolving over time. The current study therefore approaches the explanation of loyalty intentions in a different way. Specifically, the argument is made and a model is tested and supported of loyalty intentions based upon attitudinal, goal directed conceptualizations. Specifically we adapt the Model of Goal Directed Behavior (MGB) posited by Perugini and Bagozzi, (2001) and apply the model to loyalty in a B2B service context. First, the goal directed, attitudinal explanatory model represented by the MGB conceptualization is supported by the current research. Second, two proposed extensions of the MGB are supported involving unique forms of attitude and perceived behavioral control. Finally, a multi-stage loyalty conceptualization is generally supported by the data. The managerial and research implications of the study are presented and discussed.

Taylor, Steven A. and Timothy Longfellow (2005), Understanding How Attitudes Affect Physician Compliance with Legal Behavioral Constraints,” Journal of Hospital Marketing and Public Relations, Vol.15, No. 2, 91-107.

Description: This study investigates how physicians in one state (Illinois) attitudinally cope with a recent law mandating physician behaviors. Specifically, this study focuses on OB/GYN physician compliance with The Sexual Assault Survivors Emergency Treatment Act (Public Law 92-156, 2002), which requires hospitals in the state of Illinois to have an approved plan for treating sexual assault survivors. What makes this research setting interesting are the potential linkages between the legal mandate, physician attitudes, and the ongoing controversy concerning abortion. The results of a census of OB/GYN physicians within the state suggest (1) this physician group is largely supportive of the letter and spirit of this law, (2) the emerging attitude models such and Perugini and Bagozzi’s (2001) MGB model explaining the formation of behavioral intentions must be treated with caution when generalizing to situations mandating legal behaviors, and (3) moderating influences such as attitude strength and religiosity have no apparent effect in how attitudes relate to physician motivation to comply with such laws. The managerial and research implications of the reported study are presented and discussed.

Hunter, Gary L. and Steven A. Taylor (2005), “Predicting the Initial Adoption or Upgrading of Electronic Communication Systems,” International Journal of E-Business Marketing, Volume 1, Number 4 (October – December 2005), 1-23.

Description: This study examines the factors that make a firm more or less likely to adopt or upgrade an electronics communication program. Both the factors and their relative importance are hypothesized to differ depending on whether initial adoption or upgrading is the predicted behavior. Such information is important to marketers because it can be used to more effectively target and provide value to the electronic communications market. A survey of firms’ intentions to adopt customer relationship management software is used to test the hypotheses. The theoretical bases of the study are the Gatignon and Robertson (1989) model of diffusion and the behavioral delineation of continuous and discontinuous innovations (Rogers , 1983).

Taylor, Steven A., Stephen Goodwin, and Kevin Celuch (2005), “An Exploratory Investigation Into the Question of Direct Selling Via the Internet in Industrial Equipment Markets,” Journal of Business-To-Business Marketing, Volume 5, Number 2, 39-72.

Description: This study seeks to provide exploratory insight into considerations of Internet-based direct marketing strategies aimed at industrial consumers. Our first inquiry concerns operationalizing the ability of industrial consumers to use the Internet for purchasing and/or consumption of electronic marketing communications. We specifically focus on ascertaining the generalizability of Parasuraman’s (2000) Technology Readiness Index (TRI), developed in a general consumer setting, to industrial markets. Our results suggest that the TRI demonstrates promise in terms of generalizability to industrial settings. Our second inquiry builds upon our initial findings and the concept of information overload to investigate the additive contribution of a willingness to use the Internet for these purposes. In the second stage of the research we focus on the relative contributions of satisfaction with, trust in, and value perceived from using the Internet as a business tool. The results of this second inquiry suggest that such perceptions may be as important as general technology readiness in terms of explaining the variance associated with behavioral intentions to use the Internet for purchase and information management. Together, our additive model explains between 40%-70% of the variance of these intentions in our sample of industrial consumers. Managerial and research implications are presented and discussed.

Taylor, Steven A., Michael Humphries, Roger Singley, and Gary L. Hunter (2004), “Business Student Preferences: Identifying the Relative Importance of Web Management in Course Design,” Journal of Marketing Education, Volume 26, 42-49.

Description: This study investigates the relative importance of web management practices in business curricular pedagogy from an undergraduate student perspective. Utilizing conjoint methodology, the results suggest that students early in their program of studies tend to most value (more) tests in terms of course attributes, while students later in their program of studies tend to value web management practices. Taken together these results suggest that undergraduate course design can be effectively implemented, consistent with the marketing concept, based on a sensitivity to diverse student learning styles and needs.

Taylor, Steven A., Stephen Goodwin, and Kevin Celuch (2004), “The Relative Importance of Brand Equity to Customer Loyalty in an Industrial Setting,” Journal of Product & Brand Management, 13 (4), 217-27.

Description: This study investigates the relative importance of brand equity, satisfaction, value, resistance to change, affect, and trust in the formation of both attitudinal and behavioral customer loyalty. The study involved a nation-wide sample of industrial customers of heavy equipment manufacturers. The results suggest that brand equity and trust are consistently the most important antecedents to both behavioral and attitudinal forms of customer loyalty. There is also some evidence that the models underlying the formation of behavioral versus attitudinal forms of customer loyalty may vary across research settings. Research and managerial implications are presented and discussed.

Celuch, Kevin, Steven A. Taylor, and Stephen Goodwin (2004), “Understanding Salesperson Internet Information Management Intentions: A Test of Competing Attitude Models,” The Journal of Insurance Issues, 27 (1), 22-40.

Description: This study compares two attitude models – The Theory of Reasoned Action (TORA) which includes attitude and subjective norm components, and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TOPB) which includes TORA facets and also examines a decomposed perceived behavioral control construct that consists of self-efficacy and perceived control. Data from over 700 salespersons of a medium-sized, national insurance/financial services company are used to explore the models using structural equation modeling. The results suggest that the TRA and TOPB models are comparable in terms of standard fit indices, with the TOPB adding substantially to the variance explained for internet information management intentions for both customer and company contact. These results hold implications for future theory, research, and management of information technology-related salesperson motivation.

Taylor, Steven A. and Gary Hunter (2003), “An Exploratory Investigation into the Antecedents of Satisfaction, Brand Attitude, and Loyalty within the (B2B) eCRM Industry,” Journal of Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, & Complaining Behaviors, Vol. 16 (December 2003), 19-35.

Description: This exploratory study considers a model explaining brand loyalty relative to the electronic Customer Relationship Management (hereafter referred to as eCRM) industry. The model focuses specifically on B2B relationships, and includes customer satisfaction, attitude, brand trust, affect, value, and resistance to change as model constructs. This model, exploratory in nature, begins to help sift out the relative direct and indirect influences of an increasingly complex number of known antecedents to customer loyalty. Particularly noteworthy is our failure to find a direct relationship between e-satisfaction and loyalty. Rather, we find that the e-satisfaction à loyalty relationship appears mediated by brand attitudes in this study. We also report evidence that post-consumption affect appears more closely related to brand attitude than e-satisfaction. Service provider trust also emerges as an important antecedent to brand attitude and satisfaction in this exploratory study. Managerial and research implications of the tentative results reported herein are presented and discussed.

Taylor, Steven A. and Gary L. Hunter (2002), “The Impact of Loyalty with eCRM Software and eServices,” The International Journal of Service Industry Management: Special Issue — Research on eService, 13 (5), 452-74.

Description: This study provides an exploratory investigation that looks at the well-established (in other marketing settings) relative influences of quality, customer satisfaction, and loyalty in the formation of future purchase intentions and word-of-mouth behaviors within the eCRM industry. The results suggest that all of these constructs appear important as predicted by extant service theory, with customer loyalty appearing superordinate to customer satisfaction in the formation of both customer behavioral intentions and word-of-mouth behaviors. We ultimately conclude that eCRM marketers must (1) first identify means of increasing the overall level of customer satisfaction within their industry, and (2) then begin to consider moving beyond customer satisfaction toward broader loyalty-based strategic marketing objectives to support their relationship marketing practices. We conclude by discussing the practitioner and research implications of the reported study.

Taylor, Steven A., Kevin Celuch, and Stephen Goodwin (2002), “Technology Readiness in the eInsurance Industry: An Exploratory Investigation and Development of an Agent Technology eConsumption Model,” The Journal of Insurance Issues, (Fall 2002, Vol. 25, No. 2, pp. 142-165).

Description: This study generalizes Parasuraman’s (2000) Technology Readiness Index (TRI) to agents within the insurance industry. The TRI is found to explain almost 2/3 of the explained variance of agents’ self-reported perceptions of technology readiness, with the positive dimensions of optimism and innovativeness appearing most influential in facilitating technology readiness. In addition, this study develops and empirically tests an eConsumption model to help better understand how agents form their intentions to adopt and use technology and the Internet. The results suggest that general eConsumption models from the service marketing literature can provide the basis for exploratory generalizations to the insurance industry.

Taylor, Steven A. (2001), “Assessing the Use of Regression Analysis in Examining Service Recovery in the Insurance Industry: Relating Service Quality, Customer Satisfaction, and Customer Trust,” The Journal of Insurance Issues, 24 (1 & 2), 30-57.

Description: This study explores customer service, service quality and trust judgements within the context of service recovery and relationship marketing practices within an insurance setting. The results (1) identify potential interactive and curvilinear influences that possess the ability to bias traditional regression results, (2) suggest models of consumer behavior in insurance settings may be quite heterogenous, and (3) provides a research framework to assist insurance marketers in their own inquires.

Strong, Kelly C., Richard C. Ringer, and Steven A. Taylor (2001), “The Rules of Stakeholder Satisfaction (Timeliness, Honesty, and Empathy),” Journal of Business Ethics, 32 (3), 219-230.

Description: The results of an explanatory study explaining the role of trust in stakeholder satisfaction are reported. Customers, stockholders, and employees of financial institutions were surveyed to identify management behaviors that lead to stakeholder satisfaction. The factors critical to satisfaction across stakeholder groups are the timeliness of communication, the honesty and completeness of information, and the empathy and equity of treatment by management.

Celuch, Kevin and Steven A. Taylor (1999), “Involvement with Services: An Empirical Replication and Extension of Zaichkowsky’s Personal Involvement Inventory,” Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, & Complaining Behavior, Volume 12, 109-122.

Description: This study proposes and empirically validates a reliable and valid eight-tem scale for “involvement” relative to service settings. The scale is validated across eight service firms in four unique service industries.

Taylor, Steven A. and Cesar Madrigal, Jr. (1998), “Assessing Physician/Patient Relationships in the Presence of HIV/AIDS: An Exploratory Study,” Health Marketing Quarterly, Volume 12, Number 2, 5-26.

Description: This study investigates the nature of the relationship between physicians and HIV/AIDS patients within the context of the rapidly evolvong services/relationship marketing literatures. The results of this study first suggest that HIV/AIDS patients use the expectancy disconfirmation model when evaluating the performance of their physician. In addition, the nature and power of the physician/patient relationship under these clinical conditions appears strongly related to the patient’s overall evaluation of their quality of life/life satisfaction.

Baker, Thomas L. and Steven A. Taylor (1997), “Patient Satisfaction and Service Quality in the Formation of Patient’s Future Purchase Intentions in Competitive Health Care Settings, Health Marketing Quarterly, Volume15, Number 1, 1-16.

Description: Models in the general services literature often generalize poorly to health service settings. This study replicates Taylor and Baker (1994) within the context of for-profit versus not-for-profit hospitals.

Taylor, Steven A. (1997), “Assessing Regression-Based Importance Weights for Quality Perceptions and Satisfaction Judgments in the Presence of Higher-Order and/or Interaction Effects,” Journal of Retailing: Special Issue on Services Marketing, 73 (1), 135-159.

Description: Service marketers have historically assumed that service quality perceptions and satisfaction judgments contribute to desirable outcomes (e.g., purchase intentions) in an additive fashion. Taylor and Baker (1994) demonstrate that interaction effects between quality perceptions and satisfaction judgments may be prevalent in service marketing scenarios. This study extends the line if inquiry by investigating the potential for higher-order as well as interaction effects within service contexts. A large, multi-industry study is presented demonstrating that failure to identify true higher-order and/or interaction effects can lead to biased regression weights. A framework is presented to assist marketers in identifying such effects in their own competitive setting.

Taylor , Steven A., Joel D. Nicholson, Jorge Milan, and Ramiro Valencia Martinez (1997), “Assessing the Roles of Service Quality and Customer Satisfaction in the Formation of Purchase Intentions of Mexican Consumers,” Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice: Special Issue on Multicultural Marketing, (Winter 1997), Volume 5, Number 1, 78-90.

Description: An empirical replication of Taylor and Baker’s (1994) model of the formation of consumers’ purchase intentions is conducted in Mexico with results suggesting that Mexican consumers may use additive models in some service setting in contrast to the interactive models identified in consumers from the United States.

Taylor, Steven A. (1996), “Consumer Satisfaction and Marketing Education: Extending Services Theory to Academic Practice,” Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, & Complaining Behavior, Volume 9, 207-220.

Description: The relative merits of extending advances in customer satisfaction measurement to academic settings is presented and discussed. An empirical validation of Oliver’s (1993b) model of customer satisfaction is also presented.

Richard R. Brand, J. Joseph Cronin, Jr., and Steven A. Taylor (1995), “The Measurement and Importance of Service Quality in the Retailing of Recreational Services,” Journal of Customer Service in Marketing & Management, Volume II, Number 3, 45-66.

Description: Presents an empirical study that (1) identifies the importance of the recreational service sector to services marketers and practitioners, and (2) assesses the efficacy of the SERVPERF versus SERVQUAL scales in recreational services for purposes of service quality measurement. The results suggest that differing recreational services appear to possess unique properties that dictate whether SERVPERF or importance-weighted SERVPERF should be used.

Taylor, Steven A. and Thomas L. Baker (1994), “An Assessment of the Relationship Between Service Quality and Customer Satisfaction in the Formation of Consumers’ Purchase Intentions,” Journal of Retailing, 70 (2), 163-78.

Description: This study presents an empirical assessment of the nature of the relationship between service quality and consumer satisfaction in the formation of consumers’ purchase intentions. The conclusion of this study, contrary to the assumption of the implicit assumption of much of the literature to date, is that this relationship is best described as moderating versus mediating.

Taylor, Steven A. and J. Joseph Cronin, Jr. (1994), “An Empirical Assessment of the SERVPERF Scale,” Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice, 2 (4), 52-69.

Description: An empirical study is conducted on the SERVPERF scale that identifies that many of the psychometric problems associated with the SERVQUAL scale appear to similarly limit the SERVPERF scale.

Hemmasi, Masoud, Kelly C. Strong, and Steven A. Taylor (1994), “Measuring Service Quality for Strategic Planning and Analysis in Service Firms,” Journal of Applied Business Research, Volume 10, Number 4, 24-33.

Description: Reports an empirical study that demonstrates that service quality assessment using performance-importance analysis may be a more useful strategic management tool than the gap measures recommended by the authors of the SERVQUAL scale.

Taylor, Steven A. and Kelly C. Strong (1994), “A Note on the Measurement of Service Quality: A (Friendly) Critique of Stank,” Journal of Business Strategies, 11 (1), 76-82.

Description: This article discusses Stank’s (1993) recent call for using the SERVQUAL scale as a basis for measuring logistics service quality in light of the emerging literature criticizing the SERVQUAL model and scale.

Taylor, Steven A. and J. Joseph Cronin, Jr. (1994), “Modeling Patient Satisfaction and Service Quality,” Journal of Health Care Marketing, 14 (1), 34-44.

Description: A nonrecursive relationship between service quality and consumer satisfaction is identified and reported which may provide insights into the conflicting evidence reported to date in the general services literature.

Taylor, Steven A. (1994), “Distinguishing Service Quality from Satisfaction in Developing Health Care Marketing Strategies,” Hospital and Health Services Administration, 39 (2), 221-36.

Description: The paper presents the argument to marketing health care practitioners that service quality and satisfaction are currently confounded in health services research. The paper further provides a conclusion which purports to resolve the controversy based on emerging literature. Managerial strategic implications are presented and discussed.

Cronin, J. Joseph Jr. and Steven A. Taylor (1994), “SERVPERF versus SERVQUAL: Reconciling Performance-Based and Perceptions-Minus-Expectations Measurement of Service Quality,” Journal of Marketing, Volume 58, Number 1 (January 1994), 125-131.

Description: This manuscript represents a lengthy conceptual and empirical response to a rejoinder to Cronin and Taylor (1992). The manuscript reviews the preponderance of evidence that has emerged since Cronin and Taylor (1992) and reasserts the position that performance-based measures of service quality are more theoretically and empirically sound than measures based on objective forms of disconfirmation-based gap analyses.

Taylor, Steven A. (1993), “The Roles of Service Quality, Consumer Satisfaction, and Value in Quinn’s (1992) Paradigm of Services,” Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice, Volume 2, Number 1 (Fall 1993), 14-26.

Description: Reconciles Quinn’s exciting services paradigm from the management literature with the emerging marketing-based service quality/satisfaction literature.

Taylor, Steven A., Alex Sharland, J. Joseph Cronin, Jr., and William Bullard (1993), “Recreational Service Quality in the International Setting,” The International Journal of Service Industry Management, 4 (4), 68-86.

Description: The study investigates how service quality is treated in international recreational settings. The results suggest that the traditional exemplars of service quality investigation in the United States may not generalize well to international settings. Managerial and research implications are presented and discussed.

Cronin, J. Joseph Jr. and Steven A. Taylor (1992), “Measuring Service Quality: A Reexamination and Extension,” Journal of Marketing, 56 (3), 55-68.

Description: The study represents a theoretical development and LISREL-based empirical assessment of the service quality construct and its relation to consumer satisfaction and purchase intentions. This work calls into question the traditional conceptualization of the construct by demonstrating the efficacy of performance-only measures and supports the traditional paradigm suggesting perceived service quality is a causal antecedent to satisfaction.

Refereed International Meeting Proceedings

Taylor, Steven A. (2011), “The Role of Affect and Marketing Stimuli in Consumer Decisions about Changing Car Insurers,” 2011 Munich Behavioral Insurance Workshop, Munich Risk and Insurance Center (MRIC) at Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, Germany, December 12-13 2011.

Description: Consumer loyalty is an important marketing consideration for automobile insurance carriers. Evidence suggests that insurance scholars and practitioners should consider affective as well as cognitive considerations in how consumer loyalty judgments form, and that regret appears a particularly important affective consideration. This perspective is evidenced through a study demonstrating that (1) both cognitive and affective considerations are important in the formation of loyalty motivations related to car insurance, (2) both action and inaction effects appear related to anticipated regret in this context, and (3) marketing stimuli such as perceived price and brand advantages may have differential effects on the consumer judgment and decision-making processes underlying consumer loyalty. Together, the results suggest that understanding both the cognitive and affective foundations of these differential effects, as well as their interaction with marketing stimuli, appears important if insurance marketers and social scientists are to fully understand consumer loyalty responses. The managerial and research implications of the reported study are articulated and discussed.

Taylor, Steven A. and John H. Bantham (2005), “Measuring ‘IT Success’ at the 2008 Digital Olympic Games,” 2005 IEEE International Conference on Services and Logistics, and Informatics, August 8-10, 2005, Beijing , China.

Description: This discussion presents the argument that the 2008 Digital Olympics represents an outstanding opportunity to contribute to our understanding the appropriate basis for asserting “IT success” with large-scale consumer venues. The discussion first defines services from the perspective of the evolving service-based dominant logic in marketing. Second, these Olympic games should consider moving beyond traditional measures of “IT success” such as service quality and customer satisfaction toward broader customer equity measures. Finally, the important issues of construct equivalence and cultural influences are briefly reviewed to help guide these measurement activities.

Strong, Kelly C., Richard C. Ringer, and Steven A. Taylor (1999), “THE Rules of Stakeholder Satisfaction (Timeliness, Honesty, Empathy),” Proceedings of International Association for Business and Society (IABS), June 24-28, Paris. France.

Description: The results of a preliminary stakeholder satisfaction study are reported. Customers, stockholders, and employees of financial institutions were surveyed to identify management behaviors which lead to satisfaction. The factors critical to satisfaction across stakeholder groups are the timeliness of communications, the honesty and completeness of the information and the empathy and equity of treatment by management.

Refereed National Meeting Proceedings/Workshops

Taylor, Steven A. (2016), “Student Satisfaction with Value Co-Creation in Higher Education,” Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction & Complaining Behavior Biennial Conference, New Orleans, Louisiana, June 16th – June 18th, 2016.

Description: This study builds upon emerging discussions related to marketization practices associated with higher education by considering the role of students’ perceived value in the formation of their education-related behavioral intentions. 260 surveys were collected from undergraduate business students at a medium-sized university in the United States taking an introductory business course. Descriptive analyses, including conjoint analysis, first suggest that students prefer value delivery (associated with value-in-exchange and sales-based marketization practices) over value co-creation (feeling “better off” and associated with marketing-based learning practices) course delivery. These results suggest that a significant challenge exists for those educators trying to embrace a marketing (i.e., value cocreation) approach to higher education because students generally desire the former. Second, an attempt to conduct predictive analyses using scenarios demonstrate that Prebensen etal.’s (2015) scale of experience value fails to exhibit discriminant validity in a sample of business students from the United States. Satisfaction researchers are encouraged to carefully assess measurement models involving latent variables beyond the traditional reliability and AVE scores to also include analysis of discriminant validity in this line of inquiry.

Taylor, Steven A., Chiharu Ishida, Jamie R. Mulligan, and Myoung Jin Kim (2012), “Measuring Disconfirmation in Satisfaction Research: Considering a Latent Variable Approach,” Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction & Complaining Behavior Biennial Conference, La Verne, California, June 20th -June 24th , 2012.

Description: Oliver’s Expectancy Disconfirmation Model (EDM) asserts that satisfaction as a consumption response cannot occur without a standard of comparison, specifically performance is compared to the consumer’s expectation. This comparative process is referred to as disconfirmation. The EDM establishes disconfirmation as a unique latent construct, and further breaks disconfirmation down into objective and subjective forms. We first argue that disconfirmation is conceptually very similar to the concept of congruence (i.e., agreement, similarity, fit) in organizational theory. We then review a potential advance in using latent modeling techniques to operationalize congruence/disconfirmation processes, called the Latent Congruence Model (LCM). This model is appears to be more consistent with objective disconfirmation. Finally, there are a number of potential theoretical and modeling issues that are identified for consumer satisfaction researchers to consider if interested in using the LCM in consumer satisfaction research, including issues related to multicollinearity and model identification/rank-order conditions.

Taylor, Steven A. and Chiharu Ishida (2010), “A Proposed Framework For Assessing Measurement Models Involving Self-Report Consumer Satisfaction Judgments,” Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction & Complaining Behavior Biennial Conference, June 15 – 18, 2010, River Forest, Illinois, pp. 95-107.

Description: Virtually all measures of consumers’ satisfaction judgments to date are based upon self-report measures. Classical testing theory (CTT) has been largely considered to date to be an adequate theoretical underpinning for assessing the veracity of self-report satisfaction measures, with an almost universal focus on issues related to reliability and validity of construct measures as standards for measurement efficacy. However, the current research identifies recent advances in measurement theory and practice that we suggest would benefit the assessment of measurement models associated with self-report satisfaction studies. A three-phase framework is proposed to assess satisfaction-based measurement models relying on self-reports. The proposed framework is then demonstrated through a study assessing student course satisfaction.

Hunter, Gary L. and Steven A. Taylor (2004), “A Propositional Framework Exploring Consumers’ Shopping Center Choices,” Enhancing Knowledge Development in Marketing, Ed. Kenneth L. Bernhardt, James S. Boles, and Pam Scholder Ellen. American Marketing Association Summer Educators’ Conference. Chicago : AMA 15, 267. (Abstract).

Description: A theoretical conceptualization consumers’ shopping center choice based on Perugini and Bagozzi’s MGB attitude model.

Taylor, Steven A., J. Joseph Cronin, Jr., and Allen W. Imershein (1993), “Channel Power: A Proposed Multidimensional Perspective,” Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Science’s 1993 Conference, Volume XVI, M. Levy and D. Grewal (Eds.), 599-604.

Description: A theoretical conceptualization of channel power which extends Taylor (1992) by demonstrating that channel power may be more appropriately viewed as a multidimensional construct which operates at numerous levels of dyadic channels relationships.

Taylor, Steven A. (1992), “Power and Conflict in Marketing Channels: An Alternative View,” Contemporary Business Issues: Proceedings of the 1992 Academy of Business Admin istration Conference, Sammy G. Amin, ed. Academy of Business Admin istration, 755-764.

Description: A conceptual study which proposes a broader conceptualization of the power construct and its relation to conflict coupled with a series of propositions for future research consideration.

Joseph Cronin, Jr., Peter Stanwick, and Steven A. Taylor (1992), “A Model of the Relationship Between the Environment, Strategy, and Performance,” Developments in Marketing Science: Proceedings of the 1992 Academy of Marketing Science Conference, Volume XV 1992, Victoria L. Crittenden, ed. Academy of Marketing Science, 1-5.

Description: A conceptual study which extends the environmental focus presented by McKee, Varadarajan, and Pride (1989) by considering how five different dimensions of the environment (complexity, dynamism, concentration, capacity, and interconnectedness) interact with the type of adaptive strategy chosen to ultimately impact the overall performance level of a firm. Propositions for future research consideration are also presented.

Taylor, Steven A., J. Joseph Cronin, Jr., and Allen W. Imershein (1992), “Organizational Theory and Paradigms of Organizational Behavior,” Marketing Theory and Applications: Proceedings of the American Marketing Association 1992 Winter Educators’ Conference (Focus on Theory Construction), Chris T. Allen et al, eds. Volume 3, American Marketing Association, 162-176.

Description: Proposes a Kuhnian-based theoretical explanation of organizational behavior based on recent advances in sociology which purports to better explain the influences of philosophical and sociological variables on organizations and markets.

Taylor, Steven A., J. Joseph Cronin, Jr., and Randall S. Hansen (1991), “Schema and Script Theory in Channels Research,” Marketing Theory Applications: Proceedings of the 1991 American Marketing Association Winter Educator’s Conference, Eds., Terry L. Childers, Scott B. Mackenzie, Thomas W. Leigh, Steve n Skinner, John G. Lynch, Jr., Susan Heckler, Hubert Gatignon, Raymond P. Fisk, and John L. Graham, 15-26.

Description: A conceptual explanation extending schema and script-based theory to channels research.

Stanwick, Peter, J. Joseph Cronin, Jr., and Steven A. Taylor (1991), “Environmental Scanning, Environmental Uncertainty, and the Capabilities of the Firm: A Proposed Framework,” Proceedings of the 1991 Academy of Marketing Science Conference, Volume XIV, Robert L. King, ed. Academy of Marketing Science, 106-110.

Description: A conceptual framework is proposed which identifies the environmental scanning characteristics of the firm based on two environmental dimensions; (1) environmental uncertainty, and (2) the capabilities of the firm to implement the adaptive strategy.

Refereed Regional Meeting Proceedings

Taylor, Steven A. and J. Joseph Cronin, Jr. (1994), “Operationalizing Consumers’ Perceptions of Service Sacrifices: An Exploratory Analysis,” Proceedings of the Southern Marketing Association, Brian T. Engelland and Alan J. Bush (Eds.), Southern Marketing Association.

Description: A LISREL-based empirical analysis of the operational determinants of consumers’ perceptions of the Sacrifices inherent in service-based exchanges is reported.

Taylor, Steven A. and Kelly C. Strong (1994), “Service Value & Strategic Decision Making: An Exploratory Analysis,” Proceedings of the 37th Meeting of the Midwest Division of the Academy of Management , (Forthcoming).

Description: An exploratory empirical study which assesses the psychometric properties of the four alternative definitions of the service value construct identified in Zeithaml’s (1988) conceptual model. The role of service value in strategic decision making is further explored.

Taylor, Steven A., J. Joseph Cronin, Jr., and Richard R. Brand (1993), “Assessing the Dimensionality of Services Data: A Proposed Method of Triangulation,” Proceedings of the 1993 Atlantic Marketing Association, Volume IX, Donald L. Thompson (Ed.), 242-246.

Description: An empirical study which calls on marketing researchers to use multiple methods of validating service quality data. A study is presented demonstrating three separate techniques for confirming the factor structure of data sets: (1) confirmatory factor analysis using LISREL, (2) exploratory factor analysis using maximum likelihood, and (3) multidimensional scaling.

Taylor, Steven A., Randall Hansen, and Richard Heiens (1992), “Service Quality: An Examination Using Multi-Dimensional Scaling,” 1992 Proceedings of the Southern Marketing Association, Robert L. King, ed., 401-405.

Description: An empirical investigation using multi-dimensional scaling techniques of the relationship between perceived service quality of consumers in a number of recreational service settings.

Taylor, Steven A. (1991), “Importance in Leisure Activities: An Exploratory Factor Analysis,” Proceedings of the 1991 Southern Marketing Association, R. L. King, ed., 241-45.

Description: An exploratory empirical investigation of the hypothetical construct “importance” in the leisure activities and recreational setting which identifies three factors for future research consideration, including (1) event environment, (2) event quality, and (3) event cost.

Hansen Randall S., Katharine S. Hansen, and Steven A. Taylor (1991), “The Ethical Implications of Television Advertising to Children: An Advertising Effects Model,” Proceedings of the 1991 Southern Marketing Association, Robert L. King. ed., 359-63.

Description: A conceptual study which reviews the literature and develops a model of the influence of television advertising on young children, and includes a discussion of the ethical implications of the proposed model.

Taylor, Steven A., J. Joseph Cronin, Jr., and Gary C. Oliphant (1990), “The Hospital Marketing Paradox,” Progress in Marketing Thought: Proceedings from the 1990 Southern Marketing Association. Eds., Louis M. Capella, Henry W. Nash, Jack M. Starling, and Ronald D. Taylor, 435-439.

Description: A conceptual study which identifies a paradox in hospital-based marketing practices which suggests marketing strategy efficiency should be an important consideration for marketing researchers and practitioners in this important industry.

Oliphant, Gary C., J. Joseph Cronin, Jr., and Steven A. Taylor (1990), “The Impact of Organizational Strategy on Interfirm Channel Conflict and Satisfaction,” Progress in Marketing Thought: Proceedings from the 1990 Southern Marketing Association. Eds., Louis M. Capella, Henry W. Nash, Jack M. Starling, and Ronald D. Taylor, 212-217.

Description: A conceptual study which develops a set of research propositions based on the Miles and Snow (1978) typology. Winner of the Outstanding Paper in the Channel of Distribution, Product, and Pricing Track.

Select Grants Received (Total to Date = $113,000)

  • Title of Project: Consumer Needs and Social Networking, Fiscal years 2011-2012 (Internal Undergraduate Research Grant Funded, $12,000). Article in Refereed Publications: (Taylor et al., 2012)..
  • Title of Project: Understanding Intention Formation of Digital Piracy Behaviors, Fiscal years 2007-2008 (External Research Grant via ISU’s Digital Citizenship Project, $30,000). Articles in Referred Publication: Taylor (2012a), Taylor (2012b), Taylor et al. (2009).
  • Title of Project: Understanding Professional Liability Insurance, Fiscal Year: Spring 2004 (External Research Grant, Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company, $40,000). Articles in Referred Publication: “Understanding (Customer Based) Brand Equity in Financial Services,” Journal of Services Marketing, 21 (4), 241-252, (2006). ”Testing an Expanded Attitude Model of Goal Directed Behavior in a Loyalty Context,” Journal of Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, & Complaining Behaviors, Volume 19, pages 18-39, (2007).
  • Title of Project: Understanding Technology Readiness and Intentions to Use the Internet in Industrial Business Settings, Fiscal Year : July 2002 – June 30, 2003 (Partially Funded, $5,140.50). Article in Referred Publication: “eCommerce and Industrial Business Consumers: An Exploratory Investigation Into the Question of Selling Direct,” Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, 5 (2), 39-72, (2005).
  • Title of Project: Understanding Industrial Marketing Relationships, Fiscal Year: July 2000 – June 30, 2001 (Internal Grant Funded, $5,000). This met the URG program requirements to again seek URG support. Article in Referred Publication: “The Relative Importance of Brand Equity to Customer Loyalty in an Industrial Setting,” Journal Product & Brand Management, 13 (4), 217-27, (2004).
  • Title of Project: An Empirical Investigation of Service Value and Involvement, Fiscal Year: July 1998 – June 30, 1999 (Funded, $8,000). Article in Referred Publication: “Involvement with Services: An Empirical Replication and Extension of Zaichowsky’s Personal Involvement Inventory,” Journal of Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, and Complaining Behaviors, Volume 12, 109-22, (1999).
  • Title of Project: An Examination Into the Relationship Between Service Quality and Patient Satisfaction, Fiscal Year: July 1996 – June 30, 1997 (Funded, $7,000). Article in Referred Publication: “Patient Satisfaction and Service Quality in the Formation of Patient’s Future Purchase Intentions in Competitive Health Care Settings, Health Marketing Quarterly, Volume15, Number 1, 1-16, (1997).
  • Title of Project: An Examination Into the Relationship Between Satisfaction and Quality: Assessing Interactions, Fiscal Year: July 1995 – June 30, 1996 (Funded, $6,000). Article in Referred Publication: “Assessing Regression-Based Importance Weights for Quality Perceptions and Satisfaction Judgments in the Presence of Higher-Order and/or Interaction Effects,” Journal of Retailing: Special Issue on Services Marketing, 73 (1), 135-159, (1997).

Select Professional Development and Advanced Training

  • Regular attendee of the CARMA Webinar annual research method webinar series at ISU related to a plethora of research topics.
  • Participated in a full day introduction to Data Science and Big Data by IBM. November 7, 2014. The seminar provided an overview of Data Science, covered the sources and types of Big Data and highlighted the skills Data Scientists need to have in their tool box. Involved hands-on exercises with data mining software (SPSS Modeler) to ingest, clean, normalize data and create predictive and classification models. Talked about the importance of visualization in insights delivery and practice with Tableu and ManyEyes software for data visualization.
  • Participated in two-day training on the Marketplace Live simulation game I have adopted for my MKT230 sections. Knoxville, TN, October 26, 2014- October 29, 2014.
  • Completed IBM training titled IBM WebSphere Commerce Management Center Functionality (6S228). This is a 2-day self-paced online training course that I competed in preparation for developing an ecommerce course for the Dept. of Marketing. IBM Learner Portal, March 2014.
  • Completed IBM WebSphere Commerce V7 Foundation (6S220). This is a 2-day self-paced online training course that I competed in preparation for developing an ecommerce course for the Dept. of Marketing. IBM Learner Portal, February 2014.
  • CARMA Summer Short Course: Alternatives to Difference Scores – Polynomial Regression and Response, by Dr. Jeff Edwards, May 16-18, 2013 in Detroit, Michigan.
  • CARMA Summer Short Course: Alternatives to Difference Scores – Polynomial Regression and Response, by Dr. Jeff Edwards, May 16-18, 2012 in Detroit, Michigan.
  • CARMA Summer Short Course: Intermediate Structural Equation Analysis, by Professor Larry Williams, Jan. 8-10, 2009, Richmond, Virginia.
  • CARMA Summer Short Course: Advanced Topics in Structural Equation Methods by Dr. Robert Vandenberg, University of Georgia. Attended May 14-May 17, 2008. Richmond, Virginia.
  • CARMA Summer Short Course on Multi-Level Analysis Methods, May 18-20, 2006 and taught by Dr. Paul Bliese, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Richmond, Virginia.
  • Faculty Research Seminar on Logistic Regression, Illinois State University , April 8, 2005. Instructors: Peter Foreman and Matthew Nelson. April 8, 2005.
  • Item Response Theory (IRT) Workshop, Instructors: Dr. Steve Reise and Dr. Susan Embretson. SSI Scientific Software International, Chicago , IL . (May 10-12, 2004)
  • Advanced Marketing Research, SPSS Training Series. Focused on Conjoint Analysis and Multidimensional Scaling techniques. Chicago , IL (2003).
  • Structural Equation Modeling with LISREL8.5, Instructors: Karl Joreskog & Dag Sorbom, Uppsala University . Sponsored by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC), Chicago , Illinois . (2000)
  • Structural Equation Modeling with LISREL8.3, Instructors: Karl Joreskog & Dag Sorbom, Uppsala University. Sponsored by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC), Chicago , (1998)
  • Structural Equation Modeling with Amos, Instructors: Dr. James Arbuckle and Dr. Werner Wothke. Sponsored by SmallWaters Corporation, Chicago , Illinois . August 13 and August 14 1997.
  • Structural Equation Modeling with LISREL8.2, Instructors: Karl Joreskog & Dag Sorbom, Uppsala University. Sponsored by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC), Chicago , Illinois . March 19 through March 21 1997.

Select Consulting Projects

  • McLean County Chamber of Commerce (2011-2012). Involved a (pro bono) joint effort between ISU and the McLean County Chamber of Commerce to address dwindling membership and engagement concerns. Personally conducted a series focus groups of stakeholder groups and presented a written and oral report to the Executive Board of the McLean County Chamber of Commerce. Followed this up with a complex membership survey development project that I developed and implemented with Country Company Insurance and Financial Services.
  • Afni Insurance, Outsourcing and Insurance Subrogation (2005). This project involved conducting a focus group of senior insurance professionals in order to gain a better understanding of subrogation practices as they relate to the insurance industry. The final report included a brief literature review of outsourcing trends in general, insurance industry outsourcing trends, the results of the focus group, and a set of recommendation to assist insurers and subrogation vendors in developing and maintaining healthy and productive long-term marketing relationships.
  • Interstate Insurance Group (a subsidiary if Fireman’s Fund (2004)), Modeling Brand Equity and Loyalty in the Professional Liability Insurance (PLI) Industry for Accountants (2004). This project involved three (3) independent yet complementary studies. Study 1 involved measuring brand equity in this industry setting using multidimensional scaling (MDS) techniques. Study 2 identified attribute importance using conjoint analyses. Study 3 involved the most recent attitudinal model in the literature to date (Perugini and Bagozzi 2001). A total of 6000 surveys were sent out. Results suggested that brand equity and attitudinal loyalty as quite low for this industry, in spite of good performance by insurance marketers. A series of managerial and research recommendations were developed and presented to IIG’s senior management team in Chicago in May 2004.
  • Planned Parenthood of Illinois (2003). Modeling Health Service Providers’ Abortion Attitudes (2003). This study is quantitative in nature and involves the development of a comprehensive attitudinal model of abortion attitudes of health service providers (physicians, nurses, and pharmacists). This project is currently ongoing and involves a large mailed survey.
  • KANA, Inc. (2002) Understanding B2B Consumption in the CRM Software Product Space (2002). This project involved a qualitative investigation into the attributes and general consumption model associated with adoption and implementation of multi-million dollar CRM software. Focus groups were conducted in the United States and Europe developing a better understanding of the commonality and differences associated with constructs such as quality, satisfaction, value, and loyalty.
  • KANA, Inc. and Blue Hammock (2002). Measuring Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty with CRM software/service (2002). This project involved two comprehensive international studies of customer satisfaction with CRM software and service across B2B CRM providers. The study was quantitative in nature using survey-based online data collection methodologies. Results included the development of a series of IMC-related marketing strategies.
  • State Farm Insurance Companies. Understanding Renter’s Insurance (2002). The project was both qualitative and quantitative in nature. First, a series of focus groups were conducted on renting professionals and renting customers to form the basis for a follow-up quantitative study using an online survey. Results included the development of a series of IMC-related marketing strategies.
  • Country Companies Insurance and Financial Services. Understanding Technology Readiness of Agents in Insurance and Financial Services (2002). The project was quantitative in nature and involved a mailed survey of over 600 agents. The results formed the foundation for a series of recommendations to assist marketers in helping agents more readily adopt technology in support of emerging technology-based corporate initiatives within this industry.
  • Caterpillar, Inc. Developing a Technology-Sensitive Integrated Marketing Communication Strategy (1999-2001). Developed a series of six formal presentations to the corporate advertising team of Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria , Illinois during 1999-2001 concerning the (1) evolution of eBusiness and eMarketing activities, (2) influence of the Internet on marketing communication practices, (3) the synergies possible between relationship marketing activities and technology-based communication initiatives, and (4) how to develop an integrated marketing communication (IMC) strategy.
  • KANA, Inc. Measuring Customer Satisfaction with CRM software/service (2001). This project involved a sophisticated study of customer satisfaction with CRM software and service of this B2B CRM firm. The study was quantitative in nature using survey-based online data collection methodologies. Results included the development of a series of IMC-related marketing strategies.
  • Country Companies Insurance and Financial Services. Understanding Consumer Perceptions of Quality, Satisfaction, and Trust in Insurance and Financial Services (2001). The project was quantitative in nature and involved a mailed survey of over customers of a medium-sized insurance and financial services organization. Results included the development of a series of managerially oriented and IMC-related marketing strategies.

Select Presentations

  • Taylor, Steven A. (2016), “Attitude and Gender as Predictors of Insurance Loyalty,” International Symposium on Social Sciences and Management, Fukuoka, Japan, February 1-3, 2016. Also served as session chair.
  • “Modeling Digital Piracy as Consumer Behavior,” Keynote Presentation, The Global Business, Management Information System, Economics and Finance Research Conference. Tokyo, Japan, July 24-July 26, 2014.
  • “Digital Piracy,” the 2013 Hinderliter Chair Academic presentation, State Farm Hall, College of Business, March 22, 2013.
  • “Moving from Marketization to Marketing of Higher Education: The Co-creation of Value in Higher Education,” poster presented at the Illinois State University 2013 University-Wide Teaching & Learning Symposium, January 9, 2013.
  • McLean County Chamber of Commerce Membership Survey development Results,” presented to the Executive Committee of the McLean County Chamber of Commerce on 10/18/2012.
  • McLean County Chamber of Commerce Membership Focus Group Results,” presented to the Executive Committee of the McLean County Chamber of Commerce on 5/10/2012.
  • “Social Networking,” Presented by Taylor, Steven A. and Jamie Mulligan-Weiland, Building Business Through Social Media – Katie Insurance School Symposium Series, Illinois State University, presented April 2011. 60 minute presentation to an audience size of approximately 50 insurance middle and senior managers.
  • “An Exploratory Study of Student Engagement in Major and Non-Major Coursework,” ISU 2011 Annual University-Wide Teaching and Learning Symposium, 2011.
  • “A Service Perspective on the Marketization of Undergraduate Education,” ISU 2011 Annual University-Wide Teaching and Learning Symposium, 2011.
  • “Implicit and Explicit Attitudes in Folk Explanations of Digital Piracy,” presented at the 18th Annual Frontiers in Service Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, October 31, 2009.
  • “Introduction to ISU’s Statistical Consulting Center,” College of Nursing Brown Bag Series, 2007. 45 minute presentation to an audience size of approximately 25 educators and doctoral students.
  • “Lessons Learned on Working with Outsourcing and 3rd Party vendors in Claims,” Annual National Association of Insurance Subrogation Professionals (NASP), Orlando, Fl 45 minute presentation to an audience size of approximately 100 insurance managers.
  • “Outsourcing and Insurance Subrogation,” presented at the 3rd Annual National Property Subrogation ExecuSummit, New York , New York . April 25, 2006. 50 minute presentation to an audience size of approximately 40 senior managers.
  • “Capturing Video and Using Video in the Classroom,” COB Technology Buffett, Fall
  • “Relationship Marketing,” presented as part of 44th Annual All Industry Day 2005, Central Illinois Chapter of the Chartered Property and Casualty Underwriters (CPCU), November 3, 2005. Audience size approximately 600.
  • “The Utility of Web Pages in Fostering the Mclean County Brand Image,” presented to Leadership Mclean County, Illinois State University, February 2005.
  • “Understanding the Research Support Needs of Faculty at ISU,” Illinois State University. Conducted and presented an online survey of ISU faculty related to their perceptions of research support and existing needs. Presented to the University Statistical Consulting Group, Fall
  • “An Introduction to Conjoint Analysis,” with Gary Hunter, Department of Marketing. April 2003. This was a two-hour brown bag presented for university-wide ISU faculty in Spring
  • “Marketing, IT, and Strategic Planning,” September 2002, the Association of Information Technology Professionals, Bloomington, IL.
  • “An Introduction to Marketing for Construction Services,” July 2002, Gantry Cranes, Peoria, IL .
  • “Introduction to LISREL 8.3: Fundamentals of Structural Equation Modeling,” with Jef Kahn, Department of Psychology. This was a two-hour brown bag presented to university-wide ISU faculty in Spring
  • “Managing Customer Relationships,” 1996, Bloomington, Illinois. Presented as a special workshop sponsored by the Central Illinois Chapter of the American Marketing Association. The professional presentation fee was donated back to the AMA.
  • “Service Quality and Patient Satisfaction,” 1996, Pana, Illinois. Presented special workshop to the governing board and medical staff of Pana Community Hospital as a professional courtesy (no fee accepted) to assist in JCAHO hospital accreditation requirements for in-service training.
  • “Preparing for Graduation,” 1996, Illinois State University. Presented an evening seminar to the Business Club.
  • “Designing Focus Groups,” 1995, Bloomington, Illinois. Developed and presented a tutorial workshop on qualitative research in support of professional development efforts of the Central Illinois Chapter of the American Marketing Association. Joint effort with Jim Charlesworth, Marketing Research Director, Growmark. The professional presentation fee was donated back to the AMA.
  • “Marketing,” 1995, Illinois State University. Presented a discussion of Marketing and its relevance to a student Business Learning Community group, sponsored by Dr. A. Dillingham, Undergraduate Academic Services.
  • “Marketing at ISU,” 1994, Illinois State University. Presented a discussion of self-marketing to the ISU Chapter of the American Marketing Association.
  • “Customer Satisfaction and Accounting Practices,” 1994, Bloomington, Illinois. Presented a special workshop for the Central Illinois Chapter of the American Accounting Association. The professional fee was donated back to the AAA.
  • “Recreational Service Quality in the International Setting,” July 1992, presentation at the 2nd International Research Seminar in Service Management, aix-en-provence, institut d’administration des enterprises universite d’aix-marseille, France.
  • “Distinguishing Service Quality and Consumer Satisfaction in Health Services,” 1993, Champaign, Illinois. Presented a mini-workshop and participated as a member of a discussion panel for the Central Illinois Chapter of the American Marketing Association, Champaign, Illinois. The professional fee was donated back to the AMA.

Special Awards

  • Recognized as a Top 5% Reviewer for the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science and invited onto the Editorial review Board (September 2016).
  • Nominated for Illinois State University Teacher of Year (2013) but not selected for university-wide honors.
  • Outstanding University Researcher (2013), Illinois State University, Normal, IL.
  • Selected as inaugural Hinderliter Chair of Business, Illinois State University, in 2012. This was a two-year rotating appointment.
  • Outstanding Reviewer, Journal of Service Research, 2007.
  • Country Financial Faculty Scholar (2006), College of Business, Illinois State University, Normal, IL.
  • College of Business Outstanding Teacher (2001), Illinois State University, Normal, IL.
  • Caterpillar Scholar (1998, 2003), College of Business, Illinois State University.
  • Inducted into Beta Gamma Sigma as a faculty member (1997).
  • Outstanding Researcher for College of Business (1997, 2011), Illinois State University, Normal, IL.
  • Wilma Jean Alexander Technology Innovation Award (1997), College of Business, Illinois State University, Normal, IL.
  • University Teaching Initiative Award (1997), Illinois State University, Normal, IL.
  • University Research Initiative Award (1995), Illinois State University, Normal, IL.
  • Outstanding Ad Hoc Reviewer (1993), Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science
  • Navy Achievement Medal (Second Award), Awarded by the Chief of Naval Operations, (1989).
  • Navy Achievement Medal, Awarded by Secretary of the Navy (1988).
  • Good Conduct Award, United States Navy, (1979).

University Service (Annotated)
External

  • Co-Editor, Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction & Complaining Behavior, (2006-2013). Associate Editor, Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction & Complaining Behavior, (2013-Present).
  • Member (Initial Invitee), Editorial Review Board, Journal of Service Research. (1997 to Present)
  • Member, Editorial Review Board, International Journal of Service Industry Management, (1994 to present).
  • Founding Member, SPSS Academic Advisory Board, Chicago , IL . (2002 to 2005).
  • Central Illinois Chapter of the American Marketing Association: Treasurer (1994-1995), Vice President of Communications (1993-1994)
  • Co-Ordinator, Special Workshop on Relationship and Services Marketing, 1996 American Marketing Association Summer Educator’s Conference, San Diego, CA.
  • Co-Ordinator, Special Workshop on Relationship Marketing, 1995 American Marketing Association Winter Educator’s Conference, San Diego, CA.
  • Ad hoc reviewer for the Journal of Marketing, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Journal of Retailing, as well as numerous other journals. Review approximately 20-30 journal articles annually for prestigious Marketing journals between 1996 to present.
  • Additionally annually review for numerous National and Regional conference proceedings.
  • Reviewer, SPSS, Inc. (1994 to 2003).
  • Faculty Exchange Program, ITESM, Monterey, Mexico (Summer 1996).
  • Analyst for the 1991 Florida Governor’s Task Force on Private Sector Health Care Responsibility.
  • Have donated time and expertise to numerous organizations as a representative of the Illinois State University, College of Business, and Department of Marketing, including: * Reviewed and identified areas of improvement for Heritage Enterprises, Inc.’s satisfaction and discharge surveys for their nursing homes (1996). * Assisted Barbara Gould of Effective Marketing Solutions with an overview and evaluation of their market strategy and competitive emphases (1996). * Served as moderator for the Pana Community Hospital’s 1995 Annual Fall retreat for Strategic Planning, entitled “Focus on the Year 2000.”
  • Represented ISU and the College of Business with a student in ISU Live on cable channel 21 on Chicago (1996).
  • Annually attend luncheons with recruiters of ISU COB students, mentored scores of students, and made many recommendations of students.

Internal – (University Wide)

    • Search Committee Member, Cross Chair in the Scholarship of Teaching (2012)
    • University Statistical Consulting Center (2005-Present, a founding member)
    • University Research Committee (2011-2012)
    • Provost Task Force on Distance Learning (2008-2009)
    • Member, University President’s Task Force on Diversity (2008-2009)
    • Member, Provost Committee on Research Development (2002 – 2009)
    • Member, State Farm Technology Faculty Development Committee (1999-2006).
    • Member, Provost’s Technology Strategic Planning Oversight Special Committee (1998-1999)
    • Faculty Advisor, Sigma Alpha Mu, 1997-2002
    • Strand Diversity Award Committee (1996-2002)
    • Institutional Review Board Executive Committee (IRB, Member), 1996-1999.
    • ECAT, Member, 1996 – 1999. * Chairman, Subcommittee for User Services * Member, University Strategic Vision Subcommittee
    • Web Master, University Foundations of Inquiry Internet Home Page (1997-1998).
    • University Commission for a Pluralistic University, Member, 1996 – 2002. * Retention Subcommittee, Member, 1996 – 2000. * Recruitment Subcomittee, Member, 1996 – 2000. * Webmaster, Internet home page for the commission, 1996 – 1999.
    • Donated analysis of University collected (qualitative) data for Non-Tenured Faculty Satisfaction Survey (1997).
    • Represented the College of Business as a panel speaker as part of the University Ethics Program (Spring 1999).
    • Represented the College of Business as a faculty speaker at the University Open Forum of Foundations of Inquiry (Fall 1996).
    • Sponsor, ISU Tae Kwan Do Club (1995 – 1997).
    • Bromenn/ISU Center for the Study of Aging, Fellow, 1992-1998.
    • University Multicultural Center’s Advisory Committee, Member, 1993-1998.
    • ISU Bureau of Tourism and Recreation Research, Member, 1997-1999.
    • Community Agents for Hispanic & Native American Recruitment for ISU (CAHNAR), Member, 1993-1996.
    • ISU Organization for Latin American Employees (OLE), Member, 1993-1996.
    • University Minority Professional Opportunities Membership program, Member, 1993-Present.
    • University Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, Member, 1993-1995.
    • Office of Residential Life Room and Board Committee, Member, 1994-1996.
    • University Minority Student Recruitment and Retention Committee, Member, 1992-1996.
    • University NCA Accreditation Committee (General Education Special Topics Subcommittee, Member, 1993-1994).
    • Search Committees: * Assistant Director of Marketing ISU Organization for Residential Life (ORL), Chair, 1998. * Director, Affirmative Action, Member, 1998. * Coordinator of Instructional Technology Development, Member, 1998. * High Potential Student Support Services Program’s Search Committee for a Freshman Component Counselor, Member, 1993.

Internal – (College)

  • College of Business Minority Student Mentor , 1995 – Present
  • Faculty Search Committee, Department of Marketing, Summer/Fall 2015.
  • COB College Faculty Status Committee (CFSC), 2011-2013
  • Chairman, Five-Year Review Committee for Chair of Finance, Insurance and Law Department, 2012-Present
  • MBA Faculty Council, Member, 2012-Present
  • COB Associate dean Screening Committee, Member, 2012
  • College Technology and Physical Environment Committee (1998-2002, 2007-2012) Chair (1998-1999), Member (1999-2002, 2007-2012)
  • Member, Department of Marketing Curriculum Team (1998-2005)
  • Technology presentation to InRoads students visiting COB (1998)
  • Chairman, College Subcommittee for Technological Integration (1997)
  • Webmaster, Department of Marketing, 1996 – 2000.
  • College of Business Research Committee, Member, 1996 – 1998.
  • College of Business Council, Member, 1993 – May 1996. Acting Secretary (1/93-9/93), Secretary (5/94-5/95).
  • Accounting Chair Selection Committee, Outside Member, 1993.
  • Have participated in a number of Department of Management interviews for new faculty interviews.
  • Have donated several software packages to the College of Business, including CorelDraw 6, SPSS 6.0, SPSS 6.1, and SPSS 7.0.
  • Plus innumerable departmental service contributions, including membership on the DFSC, student award selection processes, Faculty screening/selection committees, guest speaking, etc.

teaching Interests

  • Critical Thinking
  • Digital marketing
  • Marketing Research
  • Principles of Marketing
  • Service Marketing
  • Relationship Marketing
  • Health Care Marketing
  • Marketing Strategy/Management
  • Consumer Behavior

Select Teaching and Student Research Projects

  • “Pet Insurance Marketing Research Project,” 2016 Undergraduate Research Symposium, Illinois State University. Developed the Katie Insurance Research Scholar Program and myself as faculty mentor. Three students were selected from a college-wide solicitation to participate. An IRB approved focus group-based research project about per insurance with Figo, a Chicago-based insurance startup. The students helped conduct several focus groups of insurance agents and pet owners. A report was generated by the students as a white paper and oral presentation for industry distribution, as well as presentation at the symposium.
  • “An Exploratory Study of Social Networking Practices of Independent Insurance Agents in the State of Illinois,” 2012 Undergraduate Research Symposium, Illinois State University. Developed the Katie Insurance Research Scholar Program associated with the Hinderliter Chair position. Six students were selected from a college-wide solicitation to participate. An IRB approved survey-based research project about social networking was developed with the Illinois Association of Independent Agents. The students were taken to East Peoria across two days to attend the 2011 Trade Show and together collected close to 200 surveys from participants. A report was generated by the students as a white paper and oral presentation for industry distribution, as well as presentation at the symposium.
  • Developed and delivered a section (1 of 4) of the 2012 Summer ISU Business Writing Course. This new writing workshop was for undergraduate students and offered as a collaboration between the COB and the English Department. The workshop lasted three days during the summer, July 11-July 13, 2012.
  • “Social Networking and ISU Students,” 2010 Undergraduate Research Symposium, Illinois State University. Coordinated a qualitative study based on focus groups of students for presentation to the symposium. Three undergraduate students participated as an out-of-class research activity.

Industry Experience

  • AUG 87­AUG 89: Public Affairs Officer/Head, Internal Review­Naval Hospital, Great Lakes , Promoted to co-principal responsibilities as Public Affairs Officer and Head, Internal Review Department. Responsible directly to Chief Executive Officer for marketing function and investigations concerning fraud, waste and abuse in a $25 million budget. Received Navy Achievement Medal from Chief of Naval Operations for sustained superior performance. Lieutenant (0­3), Medical Service Corps.
  • AUG 86­AUG 87: Head, Outpatient Admin istration­Naval Hospital, Great Lakes , Responsible for supervising administrative support of 600,000 annual outpatient visits and 40,000 outpatient records in a diversified outpatient setting of a 159­bed JCAHO­accredited community hospital. Received Navy Achievement Medal from the Secretary of the Navy for superior performance. Lieutenant Junior Grade (0­2), Medical Service Corps.
  • MAR 84­MAY 86: Pharmaceutical Sales Representative, Sandoz Nutrition Corp., Minneapolis , MN . Successful Pharmaceutical Sales Representative in enteral nutritional products. Responsibilities included contacting and presenting to physicians, ancillary staff, and support personnel. Training included Xerox Personal Selling Skills System III. Miami , Florida territory.
  • FEB 83­MAR 84: Physical Science Technician, Naval Drug Screening Laboratory, Great Lakes , Duties included operation and maintenance of Hewlett Packard model 5880A gas chromatograph and Hewlett Packard model 9825B mass analyzers in extracting, identifying and quantifying a variety of commonly abused drugs. Developed modified procedure for isolating PCP. Received Letter of Appreciation from the United States Navy.
  • JUL 75­JUL 79: Hospital Corpsman , United States Navy, Hospital Corps, E­5. Training and experience included medical sick call, medical records, advanced field first aid, surgical/medical orderly responsibilities and clinical laboratory training. Awarded Meritorious Advancement, Good Conduct Award, and Honorable Discharge.
  • AUG 74­AUG 75: Production Worker (Doffer), Geneva Cotton Mill, Geneva, AL. Production position doffing cotton thread. Work involved simultaneous operation of up to five production machines. Full­time evening position while attending high school.

Professional Affiliations

  • SERVNET: Member
  • Literati Club: Member
  • HTML Writer’s Guild Member

Personal

  • Date of Birth: April 01, 1957
  • Married June 16, 1984
  • Three young children, ages19 to 26 years old.
  • Hobbies: Certified scuba diver, technology and computers, playing guitar.